Components / Gender / PIM / Women

Standards for collecting sex-disaggregated data for gender analysis: A guide for CGIAR researchers

Developed by the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM), the ‘Standards for collecting sex-disaggregated data for gender analysis: A guide for CGIAR researchers’ spells out ways to collect relevant sex-disaggregated data for five broad research areas:

1.Baseline or descriptive research: What crops are being grown and traded? Who is growing them? Who is trading them? What technologies are being used? What natural resources do they use, and in what ways? What are the policies and institutions that shape the environment in which farmers and consumers make decisions? What are the returns to different forms of production, trade, or livelihood activities?

2.What are the constraints facing farmers? In particular, what are the binding constraints that do not allow farmers to produce and trade more and earn better livelihoods?

3.Where are the opportunities for increased production and livelihoods? Where are the potential areas in which CGIAR could make an impact, whether through technological, institutional, or policy change?

4.How do farmers respond to living in a risky environment? These risks may be environmental such as climate change, economic through markets for both buying and selling goods, political, or personal such as health. How does the risk shape their decisions? Which people are particularly vulnerable?

5.What is the impact of projects, programs, and policies? How can projects be designed and monitored to be gender transformative? How does agricultural innovation affect women’s economic empowerment? Are gender gaps in farm productivity, income, asset ownership, or sustainable intensification changing and why?

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